Opium for the masses – the cost of Premier addiction

IF football is a supply and demand industry in England, then on first glance it appears to be working. Crowds in the Premier League are at their highest level since the 1950s and some clubs have waiting lists for season tickets that stretch back years and years. True, there is an argument that “modern football” is pricing people, notably the traditional working-class out of the … Continue reading Opium for the masses – the cost of Premier addiction

Non-League should throw carrots, but to the right people

INCREASINGLY, non-league football clubs have adopted a tactic they hope will entice fans of football league clubs to drop-by on a more frequent basis – the act of discounting admission if the fans have a season ticket of a Premier or Football League club I question this generous, and somewhat misguided approach, which does seem rather odd – cutting the price of seeing a non-league … Continue reading Non-League should throw carrots, but to the right people

Commentary Box: Edge of your seat?

IN RECENT weeks, I have visited Brighton and Swansea and I stood and watched out of necessity. As soon as the referee’s whistle started the game, the fans in my section stood up and had no intention of using the seats they had paid for. Fine, if you like terracing, but having parted with £30, I wanted my seat and owing to a damaged knee, … Continue reading Commentary Box: Edge of your seat?

A £400 transfer to Fulham. Why?

CALL IT Premier League fatigue, economics or just a case of marginalisation. I have bought a season ticket for Fulham for the 2018-19 season and frankly, I am looking forward to spending a year at Craven Cottage. In exile, perhaps, maybe a marriage of convenience, but I prefer to call it the search for something new. As a Chelsea fan since 1968, I’ve had season … Continue reading A £400 transfer to Fulham. Why?

Commentary Box: Throw carrots, but not to the wrong people

INCREASINGLY, non-league football clubs have adopted a tactic they hope will entice fans of football league clubs to drop-by on a more frequent basis – the act of discounting admission if the fans have a season ticket of a Premier or Football League club I question this generous, and somewhat misguided approach, which does seem rather odd – cutting the price of seeing a non-league … Continue reading Commentary Box: Throw carrots, but not to the wrong people

“Pay what you want” success has a message

YET AGAIN, a non-league club has benefitted from experimenting with liberalisation at the turnstiles. Hitchin Town threw the gates open and saw a four-figure crowd arrive for a league game – that hasn’t happened much in the past four decades. Admittedly, the game was important, although not as critical as it might have been if Hitchin had not already secured a play-off place, but there … Continue reading “Pay what you want” success has a message

Sutton United deserve credit for their brave move

Sutton United could well turn out to be the most value-for-money club in British football in 2015-16. The Surrey-based club, once one of non-league football’s top sides (remember 1988-89 and Coventry City?), has taken the bold step of introducing £99 season tickets to try and lure more supporters to their home games. I’ve been to Sutton quite a few times and it always seemed like … Continue reading Sutton United deserve credit for their brave move

Non-League is too expensive: £6 more realistic

Non-League football should be careful – in terms of the quality and its position in the football hierarchy, it is far too expensive. £10 to watch step three of the pyramid is not especially good value for money. Why? Let’s say that the average admission fee in the Premier League is £40 and the average crowd in the Premier League is 34,000. The average Premier … Continue reading Non-League is too expensive: £6 more realistic