Neville, Neville, how could they know?

THE WALLS are starting to close in a little on Phil Neville as he faces his first mini-crisis as manager of England’s Women. After a poor run of results, Neville reacted badly to increased scrutiny of his methods by the media, lashing out at journalists and developing something of a siege mentality. Neville, according to Suzanne Wrack of The Guardian, just cannot take criticism. “Sometimes, … Continue reading Neville, Neville, how could they know?

WSL may never have a better chance for growth in 2019-20

WITH a number of Women’s Super League games set to be staged as freebie exhibitions at major stadiums, the 2019-20 season will get off to a high profile start and attempt to build on the interest generated in the Women’s World Cup. There’s no denying that the World Cup was an enjoyable event and was far better than previous editions, but a little bit of … Continue reading WSL may never have a better chance for growth in 2019-20

Tea – best drink of the day, not a diplomatic issue

LOOSEN-up Lioness fans, Alex Morgan was merely poking fun, not hurling an insult to a nation. Football is a game that provokes such gestures of mockery, cricket thrives on “sledging” and players lift t-shirts to reveal messages after they score. It’s a product for the masses, a simple game that has no halfway measures in competitions like World Cups – win or lose. Emotions get … Continue reading Tea – best drink of the day, not a diplomatic issue

Football Media Watch: Soul and body searching

THERE’S NO denying that the Eni Aluko affair is messy and confusing and paints a very grim picture of the Football Association. But what’s equally as sad as the accusations of racism and bullying is that women’s football has become as clichéd and, dare we say, tarnished as the men’s game. There’s been some closing of ranks by the look of things, with Gareth Southgate … Continue reading Football Media Watch: Soul and body searching

In England, there are still some people who care about internationals

THE reaction of some England women to being left out of the squad for Euro 2017 was interesting, mainly because it demonstrated that for some people, international football still has value and prestige. Complaining about omissions and suggesting that the manager has “favourites” is, to quote Monty Python, “stating the bleedin’ obvious”. All managers have favourites and players who they place their trust in. Down … Continue reading In England, there are still some people who care about internationals