The crisis baton passes to Leicester City and Brendan Rodgers

LEICESTER CITY’s latest defeat,  at Tottenham Hotspur by six goals to two, underlines the crisis that is unfolding at the club. It also highlights the plight of their manager, Brendan Rodgers, who will be only too aware that he has a big hole to quickly dig himself out of. In the Premier League, there is always a “crisis club” and this season, the baton has passed from Manchester United to Liverpool to Chelsea to Leicester City. The moment a club dips into the crisis zone, they are rarely left alone to work themselves out.

The media, the owners and the fans start to analyse the situation and the answer is invariably a demand for drastic action. It is difficult for any club chairman not to do anything and it usually ends in the manager getting the sack, either by “mutual consent” or “in the interests of the club”. The future of Brendan Rodgers is now the most talked-about topic in the city of Leicester, aside from the death of Queen Elizabeth.

Leicester’s situation is not good, the results speak for themselves, played seven, lost six, one point, 22 goals conceded. Admittedly, they have had three very difficult away trips and in their seven games, four have been against the “big six”. But from the corresponding fixtures last season, Leicester picked up 10 points, so a decline has clearly taken place – in 2022, Leicester’s win rate in the Premier is 25%, in 2021, it was 45%.

This is arguably the biggest crisis of Rodgers’ career, his statistics are actually very healthy, with an overall career win rate of 52%. It is doubtful that Leicester would get a better coach in terms of his track record. He led Leicester to the FA Cup in 2021, beating one of his former employers, Chelsea, in the final.

The current position is such that a section of Leicester’s support turned against Rodgers and are calling for his dismissal. These days, it doesn’t take much for the dial to drift into the red, even if you did win the only FA Cup in the club’s history. Rodgers, as he said in his post-match interview, knows the score.

Rodgers has spoken of a chaotic summer at the King Power, with the club investigated by UEFA concerning Financial Fair Play and understandably cautious around transfer market activity. Fortunately, they escaped any sanctions from the governing body.

Leicester did lose two key players in Kasper Schmeichel (to Nice) and Wesley Fofana (Chelsea), which yielded a considerable amount of cash. Although pressure must be growing, Rodgers said before the game with Spurs that he has good backing from his board. “They have been very supportive, but I am not daft. I understand football but their support probably shows the level of work we’ve done here and the work behind the scenes.”

Leicester have a reputation for being well run and people consider they have very committed and reasonable owners. In 2020-21, the most recent financials released, the club generated £ 226 million in revenues, a 51% increase on 2019-20, but 85% of income is spent on wages. The club has more than £ 230 million of net debt, with over £ 200 million owed to the owners. Leicester made a profit of £ 44 million on player trading, an important part of their business model. Leicester is a club that does sell its top players from time to time and they do have talent that other clubs would willingly acquire for large sums of money. James Maddison is one such player and there was considerable interest from Newcastle United, among others, in the summer window. If they need to raise money to strengthen in the new year, a big fee could be received for the England international.

Reports suggest that Rodgers appears to have been dissatisfied with the club’s recruitment system. Since the last window ended, Leicester have hired a new head of recruitment, Martyn Glover, but the full benefit of his arrival won’t truly be felt until 2023. He has also spoken out about the need for fans to encourage players as the anxiety generated from the stands can affect the team. His comments were not appreciated by some of Leicester’s supporters and “Rodgers out” banners started to appear among the crowd.

Such is the short-termism of football, and that doesn’t just include boards and owners but also supporters of most clubs, the temptation will be to replace Rodgers. The days when chairmen take a chance that things will turnaround seem to have gone. However, will Leicester City actually get someone better and is nobody given the benefit of the doubt anymore?

The days of their lives – from Arsenal in the 30s to City under Pep, consistency has created legends

OVER the past few years, we have supposedly seen the “best ever” club sides in the Premier League and even Europe. When Liverpool and Manchester City went head-to-head in 2019, some were quick to proclaim them the greatest of all time, but in 2019-20, City fell short and a year later, Liverpool’s defence of their Premier crown was rather tepid. The real test of a great team is consistency over a period of time and both of these clubs have shown they have that quality. A team has a lifespan and it’s usually no more than three years, but clubs can rebuild and reinforce over that same time period. Manchester City’s team in 2017-18 is very different to the side that won the club’s fourth Premier title in five years in 2022.

City are enjoying the best period in their history. In the past five years, they have won nine major trophies, all under their enigmatic coach Pep Guardiola, including a ground-breaking treble of domestic honours in 2019. There’s only one prize that would complete the portfolio for Guardiola, and that’s the elusive UEFA Champions League. City have won four of the last five Premier League trophies, which could soon compare to Liverpool’s five in six between 1979 and 1984 and a similar haul by Manchester United between 1996 and 2001. Back in the 1930s, Arsenal were champions five times in eight years. City have won six in 11.

Periods of excellence

Arsenal

Arsenal became the first London club to win the Football League championship in 1931. It heralded the start of a glorious era for the club in which they won four more titles in the 1930s and also won the FA Cup in 1936. Arsenal’s success was triggered by Herbert Chapman, the legendary manager who also led Huddersfield to two of their three titles in the 1920s. In the 1930s, there was only the league and FA Cup, but as the game developed, there were more pieces of silver to win. Arsenal had their very lean spell, from 1953 to 1970 when they won the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup and then picked up an unexpected “double” in 1971. But the most consistent spell in the club’s recent history was undoubtedly under Arsene Wenger, when they won three titles in seven seasons and three FA Cups. Either side of the period 2002 and 2005, Arsenal almost added more trophies, notably when they reached the Champions League final in 2006, losing to Barcelona in Paris.

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Manchester United

If Arsenal were the most successful club in the inter-war period, Manchester United promised to dominate the early post-war years and the 1950s, only for tragedy to strike in 1958 when their most exciting young team perished in the snow at Munich airport. United had won two league titles with this side (1956 and 1957), and it wasn’t until the mid-1960s that they had a team that was worthy of being champions once more. This was actually quite short-lived (1964 to 1968) and after Sir Matt Busby retired, United declined. After a string of failed managerial appointments, United reclaimed their place at the forefront of English football under Alex Ferguson. After a stuttering start at Old Trafford, Ferguson eventually presided over the most successful period in the club’s history, which included 12 league titles and two UEFA Champions League triumphs. Even though the club’s position came under threat from Arsenal and then Chelsea, Ferguson still managed to bow out with a Premier League title in 2013.

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Tottenham Hotspur

In the early 1960s, Tottenham produced a team that people talked about for decades afterwards. Under Bill Nicholson, Spurs won the first 20th century “double” in 1961, playing a brand of football that delighted crowds all over England. Nicholson won four trophies in four seasons and then spent the next decade trying to replicate this period. Indeed, Spurs have struggled to win trophies ever since, their last accolade coming in 2008. There have been brief periods where they have won major prizes, notably in the early 1970s and early 1980s, but they remain an under-performing club that still promises much more than it achieves.

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Liverpool

Merseyside started to dominate football in the early 1960s when both Everton and Liverpool won the league title. Liverpool, under Bill Shankly, had a golden spell between 1963 and 1965, winning two league championships and the FA Cup. Shankly had to wait until 1973 for another trophy, but then retired, handing over to his number two, Bob Paisley. He began an even more successful period that included the continuation of the dynasty created by his predecessor. Liverpool dominated the late 1970s and 1980s like no other club had achieved before and became England’s first real European force. It all ended in 1990 and, predictably, the club struggled to recapture their status, not to mention the league title. Only in recent seasons have the club returned to the forefront of the game, rekindling the spirit that took them to the top in the 1960s. With Jürgen Klopp as manager, Liverpool have won the league, the FA Cup, the Football League Cup and the Champions League.

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Chelsea

Chelsea were another under-performing club for many years, winning four trophies in the first 90 years of their existence. They had a flurry of success in the late 1990s, winning two FA Cups, the Football League Cup and the European Cup-Winners’ Cup, but it wasn’t until 2003 that their fortunes really changed when the club was acquired by Russian oligarch Roman Abramovich. Chelsea’s financial strength grew overnight and in their second season under Abramovich, they hired José Mourinho as coach and signed exciting talent from around the world. Chelsea’s reputation changed and their trophy cabinet bulged, culminating in their first Champions League title in 2012. The club became a revolving door with respect to hiring and firing coaches and their frequent forays into the transfer market meant their team was constantly being turned over. In 2022, with war raging between Russia and Ukraine, the club changed hands after Abramovich was subject to sanctions from the UK government due to his connection to the Russian administration. It would seem doubtful that Chelsea will enjoy the same level of success going forward.

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Manchester City

Manchester City have taken over where Chelsea left off in terms of financial strength. Before the club was acquired by investors from Abu Dhabi, City had won just nine honours, the last being in 1976. Their best spell before the current era was between 1967-68 and 1969-70 when they won four major trophies. Since 2018, they have secured nine prizes, including four Premier League titles (six since 2012). They were also the first club to win the domestic treble of league, FA Cup and Football League Cup. European success still eludes them, although they did reach the final of the Champions League in 2021, losing to Premier rivals Chelsea. City have become very proficient at making every signing count, they rarely make a bad buy and they are now an attractive proposition for any potential new player – they have the resources, the top coach in the world and the track record. This is really City’s golden age.

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Most clubs have enjoyed periods where they have been the pre-eminent force in the game, although it is a relative thing. Aston Villa, Newcastle and Sunderland all had their era when they were the top clubs around, but this was in the late 19th and early 20th century. Leeds United, between 1967 and 1972, were arguably the best team in England. At the moment, it is City’s time, but where will the next market leader come from? Newcastle United, with their new ownership model may be the next club to climb aboard the serious gravy train. They may have to push one or two stubborn contenders out of the way, though.